Events
Sustainable Living Seminar - 2017 Climate Change, Let Your Voice Be Heard

Wednesday, February 15, 2017   HEC_logo
6:30 - 8:30 p.m.
Carmel Clay Public Library
55 4th Avenue Southeast, Carmel, IN 46032

RSVP

 

Scientists are extremely concerned about global environmental issues, but it is also important to know what is happening to our environment on a national and state level.  What will happen to the current environmental programs and policies in the near future?  Learn about emerging developments in the Indiana Legislature & Congress and why your voice is needed now more than ever.

  • Jesse Kharbanda, the Executive Director of the Hoosier Environmental Council, will provide information on how to protect our planet and how you can actively take part.
  • Amanda Shepherd, Senior Outreach Associate, will talk about being an advocate for the environment.

 

Indiana Advanced Energy Plan community conversation

Following the Hoosier Environmental Council, former Mayor Ballard and visiting fellow with the Institute of Civic Leadership and Mayoral Archives at the University of Indianapolis will join us along with his graduate students who are working on an Advanced Energy Plan for Indiana.  Is Indiana ready for a strategic energy policy? Students would like you to be a part of the discussion that will inform the Indiana Advanced Energy Plan, which will be presented to the Indiana State Legislature in April.



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Oppose HB 1351 'No-More-Stringent-Than' Bill
2015 Legislative Session
HB 1351 – Anti- Regulations bill
Bill author: Rep Wolkins
Co-authors: Harman, Goodin, Judy
Status: Cleared House Government and Regulatory Reform 7-4, Passed House 78-18, referred to Senate, but not voted on.  The bill died in committee.
Position: CGI Opposes HB 1351

HB 1351 would handicap Indiana policymakers. Early in his administration, Gov. Pence put a moratorium on new regulations. This bill expands the moratorium and affects all regulatory agencies: IDEM, DNR, ISDH, FSSA, CEDA, IURC, etc.

Legislators claim that federal and state regulatory bodies are too aggressive at the expense of economic growth. However, there are areas where the EPA has been weak, if not absent. For example, the EPA has not adequately protected the public from the serious pollution threats of fracking, coal ash sludge lagoons, factory farm waste, outdoor wood boilers, and above-ground chemical storage tanks to name a few.

This bill could make it illegal for regulators to enact any new regulation unless explicitly authorized by federal or state law. HB 1351 would make it state law prohibiting state regulatory agencies from making any regulations that do not strictly adhere to what is allowed in this bill In effect, it would eliminate the multi-decade discretionary authority that executive agencies have long had and could have the added effect of paralyzing agencies in carrying out their existing responsibilities out of fear of being sued for going beyond what those federal programs require.

HB 1351 weakens Indiana's ability to make its own decisions on how best to protect its people. This is inconsistent with Hoosiers’ long tradition of protecting “state’s rights", effectively, putting more, not less, power in the hands of the federal government to make those decisions for Indiana.

For more information visit http://www.hecweb.org/bill-watch-2015/hb1351/

HB 1351 is the re-incarnation of HB 1143 from the 2014 Legislative Session.

 

 

Dynamics_of_Climate_Buttons_-header_for_photos

CLASS OF 2016

Congrats to the Dynamics of Climate Class of 2016. This professional development workshop Dynamics of Climate equips middle and high school science teachers with activities and lesson plans about climate change science & solutions to improve climate literacy and encourage sustainable living practices at school and at home.  These 26 teachers from urban, suburban and rural school districts are responsible for teaching 4,404 students every year!  The schools represented are shown below.

The 2016 workshop was made possible thanks to sponsorship from the City of Carmel, Noblesville East Middle School, Purdue Climate Change Research Center,  Sierra Club Hoosier Chapter, Environmental Education Association of Indiana, Hoosier Interfaith Power & Light, Earth Charter Indiana, Rectify Solar, Inc, Solar Systems of Indiana, and Advocare Brandy Yost.  Many thanks to Mayor Brainard, Sue Maki, Brandy Yost, Leslie Webb, Alexia Lopez, and Cindy Muse.  Special thanks to Rick Towle for partnering with CGI to co-host the workshop.

  • Carmel High School (3)
  • Noblesville East Middle School
  • Fishers High School
  • Mississinewa High School (2)
  • Herron High School
  • Lebanon High School
  • Bosse High School
  • Edgewood Junior High School (2)
  • Doe Creek Middle School
  • Peru Junior High School
  • William Henry Harrison High (Evansville)
  • New Tech Institute High School
  • F.J. Reitz High School
  • IUPUI Students (9)
  • Oaklanden
  • Sense Charter School
  • Paramount

 


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CLASS OF 2015

 

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CLASS OF 2014

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Oppose HB 1053 Plastic Protection Bill
Rep Lucas, a cosponsor of the bill, has a plastic bag recycler in his district.

Position: CGI opposes HB 1053.  
CGI supports policies that build a more sustainable community, and opposes the ones that don't.
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1) On Jan. 19, HB 1053 passed out of the House government and regulatory reform committee with a 10-2 vote.  No Hamilton County representatives sit on this committee. To view the archived video of the hearing, click here and select Jan. 19th, testimony for HB 1053 begins at 48:33 min.

2) On Jan. 25, HB 1053 cleared House with a 61-32 vote. All Hamilton County representatives supported this bill.

3) On Feb. 11, HB 1053 passed out of the Senate Commerce & Technology committee with a 6-4 vote.  Disappointingly, Hamilton County senators Delph and Merrit voted for this bill in committee.

4) On Feb. 23, HB 1053 cleared the Senate with a 38-12 vote.  All Hamilton County senators supported this bill.

What's Next: HB 1053 goes to Gov. Pence.

Take Action: Please ask Gov. Pence to VETO on HB1053 to protect Home Rule, a city's right to govern itself. Cities and towns should determine what is best for their own communities.  Let him know why this is important to you.

Click here to Find Your Legislator

About the bill: HB 1053 infringes on Home Rule authority and prohibits cities & towns from regulating or imposing any prohibition or fee on plastic bags or bottles. The bill is written very broadly, so it doesn't specifically say plastic bags or plastic bottles.  Instead they are referred to as "reusable or disposable auxiliary containers."

The plastic bag manufacturers and plastic bag recyclers are trying to protect their business. Bloomington citizens are currently in the process of petitioning their city to ban single-use plastic bags as so many cities and countries around the world have done.  HB 1053 would prohibit cities from taking such action.

HB 1053 is an attack on Home Rule, a city's right to govern itself. Cities and towns should determine what is best for their own communities.  This bill handcuffs local governments and is a slippery slope.

ADDITIONAL RESOURCES:

 

OPPOSING HB 1053

  • Citizens Action Coalition
  • Association of Indiana Counties
  • Indiana Association of Cities and Towns
  • Hoosier Environmental Council

 

SUPPORTING HB 1053

  • Nobelex, recycling business, employs 275 in southeast Indiana
  • Indiana Restaurant and Lodging Association
  • Indiana Petroleum Marketers and Convenience Store Association
  • Indiana Vending Association
  • Indiana Retail Council
  • Indiana Grocery & Convenience Stores
  • Indiana Chamber of Commerce
 
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Date: Wednesday, Nov.15, 2017
1:30-7 p.m.
Carmel Clay Public Library
55 4th Avenue Southeast, Carmel, IN 46032

Are you looking for ways to make your holiday shopping a little greener and earth-friendly? This holiday season, join us at the 2017 “Green Gift Shop” for green gift ideas that are local, organic, natural, recycled, reused or repurposed.  Local businesses will showcase green gifts for family and friends.
Here are some of the businesses that will be at this years Green Gift Shop:
  • Felt Sew Good
  • The Binding Bee
  • Lands Goods LLC
  • WoodWorx
  • Eula Megli
  • Xchocol'Art
  • Home Town Sass
  • Kaps for Kids
  • Good Earth Mothers
  • That's Sew Martha
  • Norwex
  • Oh Sew Cute
  • Frangipani Body Products
  • Spring Green Garden Club
  • Judy Huntley Creations
  • Arbonne
  • Blue Porch Design
  • Mimi's Mittens
  • One Earth Body Care
  • Mill Run Honey
  • Earth Rocks
  • SewKnew Kreations
  • JuneBug's
  • Essential Wellbeings
  • Spoonfull of Vintage
  • Global Gifts
  • Arka Beads
  • Whole Foods Market
  • Soak Your Soul
  • Priya
  • Hema Patel

Along with the gift shop, visit the Carmel Clay Public Library Holiday Showcase. Did you know the Carmel Clay Public Library has hundreds of books and audiobooks filled with heartwarming holiday stories, money-saving ways to spruce up your holidays, simple to elaborate crafts for gifts, and mouthwatering recipes? Our Audiovisual Department has holiday classic movies and new releases, as well as CDs from your favorite artists. And for those hard to please teens, the library carries the latest graphic novels and most popular fiction. The Children’s Department offers an extensive holiday book collection and music and movies to delight your little ones. Books, movies, and music will be available for you to check out and take home to make your holidays brighter. Don’t have a library card? No worries, we will help you register.  Just bring some current ID and take home the best holiday gift you could give yourself, a new library card. There will be a craft for teens and children to make and take home, holiday music by pianist Julie Schlatinger, and delicious refreshments for all. Come and meet some of the dedicated library staff and learn more about one of the greatest assets available to you in Carmel, your library!

 

If you have questions, please contact Madelyn at  This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it or call 317-815-9941.

 

*** Donnelly votes to kill Clean Power Plan ***

http://thinkprogress.org/climate/2015/11/04/3719340/clean-water-rule-senate-overturn-ernst/

The Senate Just Voted To Overturn The EPA’s Clean Water Rule

BY NATASHA GEILING NOV 4, 2015 2:31PM

 

 

DONNELLY'S STATEMENT ON CPP

http://www.donnelly.senate.gov/newsroom/press/donnelly-statement-on-epas-final-clean-power-plan

Tuesday, August 4, 2015

U.S. Senator Joe Donnelly released the following statement after the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) issued its final Clean Power Plan rule to regulate greenhouse gas emissions for U.S. power plants.

“Indiana has made significant investments in clean energy in recent years.  Even without burdensome regulations (9) from the EPA, Indiana already has one of the world’s cleanest coal-fired power plants (1), the world’s largest geothermal heating and cooling system (2), and has increased renewable energy generation eightfold since 2008 (3); all while Hoosier manufacturers and consumers are embracing energy efficiency (3) to reduce their electricity bills and improve their bottom lines.

“EPA had an opportunity to encourage Indiana to continue to innovate and diversify our energy portfolio in a way that was good for our environment and good for Indiana’s economy. The final rule, however, completely missed the mark (4).  Instead of providing a workable plan with fair, achievable carbon goals, the rule requires Hoosiers to carry one of the heaviest loads (5) in reducing the country’s carbon emissions, which will make energy more expensive (4)(6)(7) for families and make it more difficult for Indiana businesses to compete. This rule seems designed to establish by regulation the ‘cap and trade’ plan that I voted against in 2009 (8).  We need to find a better way to protect our environment without disproportionally shifting the burden onto all Hoosier families.”

REBUTTALS

FACT(1): Sen. Donnelly is referring to Duke Energy's Edwardsport plant which was advertised as a "Clean Coal" Plant, but what he does not mention is that the Edwardsport plant was a $3.5 billion boondoggle that has huge operating costs and continued breakdowns, as well as being attached to investigations of misconduct resulting in state employees terminations. Edwardsport is no example of a future of clean energy as it does not control carbon – in fact it emits more carbon than other Duke coal-fired power plants because it’s so inefficient. Some good reporting on Edwardsport: http://www.bizjournals.com/charlotte/blog/energy/2015/09/duke-energy-nears-1b-in-charges-against-earnings.html

FACT(2): He's talking about Ball State's geothermal system. What he does not mention is that Ball State partially pursued this project BECAUSE of federal Clean Air Act standards for mercury pollution. Without the top-down EPA requirements, it’s possible Ball State could still be burning coal today, and be missing out on savings of nearly $2 million dollars a year.

FACT(3): Indiana has a lot of potential to create jobs in wind, solar energy and energy efficiency. The Indiana Department of Environmental Management (IDEM) says Indiana has 5 times the wind energy potential it needs to comply with the CPP goals, meaning Indiana could benefit by developing wind farms and remaining an exporter of wind as well as using wind power to power more of Indiana's needs.

Indiana has a lot of potential to grow solar energy and solar jobs. There are now more solar jobs in the United States than coal mining jobs. Yet Indiana ranks behind Michigan, Pennsylvania, Ohio and Illinois in the number of solar workers, even though we have similar sun resources.

A recent study by the American Council for an Energy-Efficient Economy calculated that Indiana could save about 25 million megawatt-hours per year – almost a quarter of what the entire state generates – through energy-saving technology that would cost less to implement than it would save in electric bills. A report released earlier this year on Energizing Indiana showed Indiana’s energy efficiency program created nearly 19,000 jobs before the program was cancelled because of pressure from Indiana monopoly utilities. Senator Donnelly can correct that mistake made by state leaders by supporting the Clean Power Plan.

FACT(4): Indiana has the flexibility to create its own plan to meet the goals of the Clean Power Plan cost effectively. The CPP allows states to come up with their own plan to meet their target. Indiana is encouraged to continue to innovate and diversify its energy portfolio to meet the carbon reduction target in a way that's good for Indiana’s economy including the ability to develop a regional plan with multiple states. In fact, MISO has indicated the developing a regional plan in partnership with other states would be more economical. Other options available to states are energy efficiency and renewable energy, and as noted above (3) Indiana has a lot of potential to create jobs in wind, solar energy and energy efficiency.

FACT(5): 13 states have higher carbon reduction goals than Indiana’s 39% goal. Also, 32 states have goals above 30%.  The targets Click here to see the list of state targets - http://www.c2es.org/federal/executive/epa/carbon-pollution-standards-map

FACT(6): Duke Energy and Indiana Michigan Power indicate they can meet the EPA carbon reduction goals for the same cost, or only a slight increase, according to preliminary Integrated Resource Plans.

FACT(7): Cost-effective implementation of the Clean Power Plan target depends on thoughtful leadership from Gov. Pence, IDEM and the IURC.

FACT(8): The CPP is not a cap and trade program. It is a rate-based program because EPA sets carbon emission rates.  States, however, do have the option of implementing various strategies and approaches, including a mass based program.  Trading is an operational flexibility that is allowed, but it is not a requirement.   Some states are looking at the mass based approach and some states may consider trading.  In fact, MISO analysis is finding that it's better to have a regional plan in terms of costs and reliability. It is much better to be in a group.

FACT(9): Unlike Donald Trump who won't take money from lobbyist or special interests because there are always strings attached, Sen. Donnelly has accepted money from Vectren a coal-burning company in Indiana, and the Keystone XL pipeline PAC.

FACT(10): Climate disruption poses a threat to our health, our families and our communities, adding a financial strain as we face increasing costs of cleaning up climate-related weather disasters. According to the 2014 National Climate Assessment, the Midwest was home to 11 of the 14 most expensive U.S. weather-related disasters in 2011 (those with damages of more than $1 billion).


FACTS ABOUT THE CLEAN POWER PLAN

EPA's Clean Power Plan (CPP) is a key component of the U.S. portfolio to reduce carbon pollution.  We need this not just so Americans can have cleaner, healthier air and less pollution at home, but because America needs to be a global leader on environmental issues. The CPP is part of Section 111d of the Clean Air Act.  Click here for the EPA website.

Nationwide, the CPP would reduce carbon pollution from the power sector 32% from 2005 levels by 2030.  2005 was used as a reference because it's commonly used in the international community.

Input from all 50 states, the public, millions of comments, and over 300 utility, consumer, labor and environmental stakeholders was used to develop the Clean Power Plan.  There are already many states, cities and communities with programs to reduce carbon pollution. The EPA evaluated these models, best practices and existing technologies across the country.

So for each state, the EPA determined carbon dioxide emissions from fossil-fired power plants, and divided this by the state's total electricity generation including fossil-fired, and any renewable and nuclear generation. This is referred to as carbon intensity or carbon rate. Carbon intensity ranges from 339 CO2/KWh in Idaho to 2246 CO2/KWh in Montana. Indiana has a carbon intensity of about 1924 CO2/KWh which is on the higher end because Indiana gets most of its electricity from coal.

Recognizing that each state's power sector has a unique set of energy resources and infrastructure, each state has its own target (shown below) and can develop its own plan for reaching its target.   Carbon reduction targets are based on 2012 data because this was the most recent and complete data available.

It is up to each state to determine the best possible plan given its unique energy resources and infrastructure.  There are several commercially available, technically feasible and cost effective strategies available, such as energy efficiency and conservation, renewable energy, using lower-emitting power sources such as gas, and making fossil-fueled power plants more efficient.

Co-Benefits

As you would expect, there are co-benefits with this carbon rule because you would also have less mercury pollution, less sulfur dioxide, and less fine particle pollution which can contribute to severe asthma attacks, lung damage, heart problems, increased hospitalizations and even premature death. The combined health and climate benefits of the Clean Energy Plan are estimated at $55 to $93 billion in 2030, according to the EPA.  This is likely a conservative estimate. For example, climate and weather disasters in 2012 cost the American economy more than $100 billion with Superstorm Sandy, severe weather, heat waves, drought, and wildfires. That's just one year and doesn't include health impacts. The potential health and climate benefits far outweigh the cost of the plan.

 

Final Carbon Reduction Targets (based on 2012 data)

http://www.c2es.org/federal/executive/epa/carbon-pollution-standards-map

1

South Dakota

-48%

26

South Carolina

-35%

2

Montana

-47%

27

Pennsylvania

-35%

3

North Dakota

-45%

28

Georgia

-34%

4

Wyoming

-44%

29

Arizona

-34%

5

Kansas

-44%

30

Texas

-33%

6

Illinois

-44%

31

Alabama

-33%

7

Iowa

-42%

32

Oklahoma

-32%

8

Wisconsin

-41%

33

Louisiana

-31%

9

Kentucky

-41%

34

Delaware

-27%

10

Colorado

-40%

35

Florida

-26%

11

Minnesota

-40%

36

New Jersey

-26%

12

Nebraska

-40%

37

New Hampshire

-23%

13

Tennessee

-40%

38

Nevada

-22%

14

Michigan

-39%

39

Mississippi

-20%

15

Indiana

-39%

40

Oregon

-20%

16

Ohio

-37%

41

New York

-20%

17

Washington

-37%

42

Massachusetts

-18%

18

Utah

-37%

43

Rhode Island

-16%

19

West Virginia

-37%

44

California

-14%

20

Virginia

-37%

45

Maine

-11%

21

Missouri

-37%

46

Idaho

-10%

22

Maryland

-37%

47

Connecticut

-7%

23

Arkansas

-36%

48

Alaska

0%

24

New Mexico

-36%

49

District of Columbia

0%

25

North Carolina

-36%

50

Hawaii

0%

51

Vermont

0%

 

Aging Indiana Coal Plants

According to the Indiana Utility Regulatory Commission’s 2013 annual report, 40 percent of Indiana’s coal-fired generating capacity comes from power plants that are more than 40 years old and 75 percent of Indiana’s coal-fired capacity is more than 30 years old. Indiana utilities will need to replace much of their coal-fired capacity by 2030 as these dirty, inefficient power plants age and become too expensive to operate. Wind power, solar power and energy efficiency can help clean our air and replace dirty coal.

The shift to lower carbon energy is already happening in Indiana. Indiana has already reduced its power sector carbon pollution by 21 percent since 2008 – a timeframe of less than seven years. The EPA plan gives us 15 years to reach the CPP target.

Indiana can create jobs in wind, solar and energy efficiency

WIND - The Indiana Department of Environmental Management (IDEM) says Indiana has 5 times the wind energy potential it needs to comply with the CPP goals, meaning Indiana could benefit by developing wind farms and remaining an exporter of wind as well as using wind power to power more of Indiana's needs. Already, Iowa gets 25 percent of its energy from wind. But Indiana only gets about 3 percent of its energy from wind power. In fact, two-thirds of the wind power generated in Indiana is sold out of state.

SOLAR - Indiana has a lot of potential to grow solar energy and solar jobs. There are now more solar jobs in the United States than coal mining jobs. Yet Indiana ranks behind Michigan, Pennsylvania, Ohio and Illinois in the number of solar workers, even though we have similar sun resources.

EE - A recent study by the American Council for an Energy-Efficient Economy calculated that Indiana could save about 25 million megawatt-hours per year – almost a quarter of what the entire state generates – through energy-saving technology that would cost less to implement than it would save in electric bills. A report released earlier this year on Energizing Indiana showed Indiana’s energy efficiency program created nearly 19,000 jobs before the program was cancelled because of pressure from Indiana monopoly utilities. Senator Donnelly can correct that mistake made by state leaders by supporting the Clean Power Plan.

Indiana Policies Needed to Reach the CPP Target

  • Energy Efficiency: In 2014, the Indiana General Assembly canceled the Energizing Indiana program, replacing it in 2015 with a plan that allows utilities to set their own energy savings goals. Indiana must restore measureable, enforceable energy efficiency goals in order to lower carbon emissions, reduce energy waste and prevent the need to build expensive and unnecessary power plants in the future. We need to reinstate energy efficiency goals for electric utilities.
  • Renewable Energy Goals: Indiana has set only voluntary goals for clean, renewable energy, giving utilities financial incentives to generate 10 percent “clean energy” by 2025. Indiana could increase its goal to 21 percent by 2030 and make it mandatory to help achieve the Clean Power Plan goals.
  • Energy Efficiency Codes: Indiana last updated its energy efficiency building codes five years ago. The state should update its energy efficiency codes for residential and commercial buildings to match recent revisions to national and international codes, and make sure the new codes are enforced.

Download Word Document

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2016 Dynamics Workshop Photos
Dynamics_of_Climate_Buttons_-header_for_photos

Congrats to the Dynamics of Climate Class of 2016. This professional development workshop Dynamics of Climate equips middle and high school science teachers with activities and lesson plans about climate change science & solutions to improve climate literacy and encourage sustainable living practices at school and at home.  These 26 teachers from urban, suburban and rural school districts are responsible for teaching 4,404 students every year!  The schools represented are shown below.

The 2016 workshop was made possible thanks to sponsorship from the City of Carmel, Noblesville East Middle School, Purdue Climate Change Research Center,  Sierra Club Hoosier Chapter, Environmental Education Association of Indiana, Hoosier Interfaith Power & Light, Earth Charter Indiana, Rectify Solar, Inc, Solar Systems of Indiana, and Advocare Brandy Yost.  Many thanks to Mayor Brainard, Sue Maki, Brandy Yost, Leslie Webb, Alexia Lopez, and Cindy Muse.  Special thanks to Rick Towle for partnering with CGI to co-host the workshop.

  • Carmel High School (3)
  • Noblesville East Middle School
  • Fishers High School
  • Mississinewa High School (2)
  • Herron High School
  • Lebanon High School
  • Bosse High School
  • Edgewood Junior High School (2)
  • Doe Creek Middle School
  • Peru Junior High School
  • William Henry Harrison High (Evansville)
  • New Tech Institute High School
  • F.J. Reitz High School
  • IUPUI Students (9)
  • Oaklanden
  • Sense Charter School
  • Paramount

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Sustainable Living Seminar - Merchants of Doubt

Wednesday, September 21, 2016        Merchant_of_Doubt_image
6:30 - 8:30 p.m.
Carmel Clay Public Library
55 4th Avenue Southeast, Carmel, IN 46032

RSVP

 

Are you confused about climate change, or know someone who is?  Climate scientists have been warning us for years and have shown multiple lines of evidence of global warming. Yet, the public and some elected officials doubt the science.  So, what does it take to cast doubt, and who would do such a thing?  Merchants of Doubt reveals how the same tactics and strategies and even some of the same people used to cast doubt on the science that linked cigarettes to cancer are being used again to cast doubt on climate science.  The film shows how two Republicans, who believe we have a moral responsibility to future generations, went from being climate deniers to climate advocates.  This powerful documentary from the acclaimed documentarian, Robert Kenner (Food Inc.), is based on the book by Naomi Oreskes and Erik M. Conway.

“Merchants of Doubt” tells the story of how a loose-knit group of high-level scientists and scientific advisers, with deep connections in politics and industry, ran effective campaigns to mislead the public and deny well-established scientific knowledge over four decades. The same individuals who claim the science of global warming is "not settled" have also denied the truth about studies linking smoking to lung cancer, coal smoke to acid rain, and CFCs to the ozone hole. "Doubt is our product," wrote one tobacco executive. These "experts" supplied it.  Find out how Robert Kenner investigates the shadowy world of professional skeptics, whose services are bought and paid for by corporations, think tanks and other special interests to cast doubt and delay public and governmental action of climate change.

RSVP

 
FrackingBill

2015 Legislative Session

Oppose HB 1321 - Pro-Fracking

Bill origin: ALEC?      
Bill author: Rep Koch  
Co-authors: VanNatter, Frye

Status: Referred to House Natural Resources, but was not heard.

This pro-fracking bill would prohibit local government entities, cities, towns and counties from regulating hydraulic fracking.  A similar bill was introduced in 2014 and also died in committee.

Youtube Video - The Fracketts
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=MD5r8WGYAug

 

 
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